INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC Stakeholder Meeting 2018

Advancing Rare Disease Research and Gene Therapy Applications with Animal Models

Munich, Hilton Park Hotel, December 3-4, 2018

The second Stakeholder Meeting of INFRAFRONTIER, the European Research Infrastructure for phenotyping and archiving of model mammalian genomes, will be jointly organized with the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC). Thematic focus of the meeting is on advancing Rare Disease research and gene therapy applications with animal models.

 

The Stakeholder Meeting provides an excellent opportunity to support a better alignment of INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC platforms with current Rare Disease research and personalised medicine initiatives, and supports interactions with human genetics centers and clinical consortia. New partnerships can support the rapid impact of mouse functional genomics analyses on the understanding of human genetic variation and disease, and the translation into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

 

The Stakeholder Meeting will be structured into three main parts:

  • Advancing Rare Disease research with animal models
  • Gene therapy applications using animal models
  • Young Investigator / Stakeholder presentations

 

Meeting aims are to:

  • Raise awareness of INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC platforms among the rare disease community
  • Present collaborative mechanisms advancing rare disease research with model organisms
  • Present use cases for the utility of model organisms to advance rare disease research 
  • Present advances in the preclinical testing of gene therapy approaches to cure human diseases.
  • Strengthen interactions with rare disease and clinical research consortia

 

 

Advancing Rare Disease Research and Gene Therapy Applications with Animal Models

Scope and context

Despite recent successes in identifying causative mutations for human heritable diseases using sequencing technologies, an associated gene has not been identified for approximately half of the reported diseases. Discovery of the genotype-phenotype relationships is a critical step towards understanding of the mechanism of these diseases and the development of new treatments.

To address this challenge and to advance the functional analysis of human genetic variation, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalogue of gene function by characterizing new knockout-mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardized phenotyping tests.

 

Rare disease, clinical genetics and personalised medicine initiatives will benefit greatly from this emerging data and biological resources, which can be used to detect novel genotype-to-phenotype associations in diseases. The continued development of data analyses and integration approaches will be required to translate mouse functional genomics studies to a better understanding of human biology and disease. Furthermore, new genome-editing technologies such as CRISPR/Cas9 now enable the efficient derivation of precision disease models incorporating patient-specific genetic variants as a means of recapitulating essential aspects of human disease in mouse and other model organisms.

INFRAFRONTIER and IMPC offer unique platforms for the functional validation of genetic variants identified in exome/whole-genome sequencing approaches and the development of mouse models with predictive utility for efficient translation. Generation of precision animal models is key for understanding the pathogenesis of human genetic diseases, and the development of new therapies for rare diseases. INFRAFRONTIER partners supported numerous custom model development projects to investigate gene function and pathophysiology of rare diseases. The IMPC phenotyping discovery resource provides an unprecedented volume of high quality data, supporting clinicians to find relevant mouse models of human disease by orthologous gene and by shared phenotypic features. 

Animal models also play an essential role for the development and preclinical testing of gene therapy approaches to cure human diseases. Animal models mimicking human disease conditions are essential at the preclinical stage before embarking on a clinical trial in the assessment of variables related to the use of viral vectors such as safety, efficacy, dosage and localization of transgene expression. Choosing a suitable disease-specific model is of paramount importance for successful clinical translation.

Gene editing is the next frontier in gene therapy and promises to correct genetic mutations that may cause disease, and to create and control genetic information within patient cells. Thousands of incurable genetic diseases are now theoretically treatable by gene editing approaches. In this context, animal models are essential tools for testing gene editing reagents and delivery systems.

 

The Stakeholder Meeting provides an excellent opportunity to explore a better alignment of INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC platforms with current rare disease and personalised medicine initiatives, and supports interactions with human genetics centers, clinical consortia and biobanks. Effective collaborative mechanisms connecting gene discovery projects with model organism communities such as the Canadian Rare Diseases Models and Mechanisms Network will be presented at the Stakeholder Meeting. New emerging partnerships will support the rapid impact of mouse functional genomics analyses on the understanding of human genetic variation and disease, and the translation into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

 

References

Confirmed speakers

Confirmed speakers are:

  • Martin Biel, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU),  GE
  • Fatima Bosch, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB),  ES
  • Steve Brown, MRC Harwell,  UK;  IMPC Scientific Chair
  • Philippe Campeau, University of Montreal,  CAN
  • Jacob Corn, ETH Zurich,  CH
  • Colin Fletcher, National Institutes of Health (NIH-NHGRI),  USA
  • Pietro Genovese, San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-TIGET),  IT
  • Melissa Haendel, Oregon Health & Science University,  US
  • Yann Herault, PHENOMIN-ICS,  FR
  • Martin Hrabě de Angelis, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Experimental Genetics & INFRAFRONTIER GmbH, GE
  • Jan Hrusak, Czech Academy of Sciences, J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry,  CZ
  • Daria Julkowska, French National Research Agency (ANR), FR
  • Monica Justice, University of Toronto, SickKids Research Institute, CAN
  • Fabio Mammano, CNR-Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, IT
  • Federico Mingozzi, Genethon, Spark Therapeutics,  FR/USA
  • Lluis Montoliu, CSIC-CNB,  ES
  • Anna Need, GenomicsEngland, Queen Mary University of London,  UK
  • Holger Prokisch, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Human Genetics,  GE
  • Helene Puccio, Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology (IGBMC),  FR
  • Olaf Riess, University of Tübingen, Institute of Medical Genetics, GE
  • Paula Rio, CIEMAT/CIBERER-ISCIII,  ES
  • Juliane Winkelmann, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Neurogenomics,  GE
  • Wolfgang Wurst, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Developmental Genetics,  GE
  • Shinya Yamamoto, Baylor College of Medicine,  USA

Status: September 17, 2018

Programme outline

Draft agenda, December 3

 

08:30-09:00 
Welcome and setting the stage

Martin Hrabé de Angelis, Helmholtz Zentrum München & INFRAFRONTIER GmbH
INFRAFRONTIER Research Infrastructure

 

09:00-13:00 
Session 1:   Model organisms facilitate rare disease diagnosis and therapeutic research

Shinya Yamamoto, Baylor College of Medicine, Undiagnosed Disease Network / Model Organism Screening Center (MOSC):  Model organisms facilitate rare disease diagnosis and therapeutic research

Steve Brown, MRC Harwell, IMPC Scientific Chair: The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) and Rare Diseases

Melissa Haendel, Oregon Health & Science University:   Monarch Initiative - Facilitate identification of animal models of human disease through phenotypic similarity

Yann Herault, PHENOMIN-ICS, PHENOMIN / Fondation Maladies Rares:  New mouse models of rare diseases

Lluis Montoliu, CSIC-CNB:  New CRISPR derived animal models of albinism

Fabio Mammano, CNR-IBCN:  In vivo genetic manipulation of inner ear connexin expression by bovine adeno-associated viral vectors

Monica Justice, University of Toronto, SickKids Research Institute:  Mouse models for Rett Syndrome

Juliane Winkelmann, Helmholtz Zentrum München:  Dystonia – a heterogeneous rare neurological disease

Holger Prokisch, Helmholtz Zentrum München:  Understand genetic variations in rare disorders leading to mitochondria-related disease

 

14:00-15:20
Sesssion 2:   EU collaborative and national initiatives targeting rare diseases

Olaf Riess, University of Tübingen, Institute of Medical Genetics:  Solve-RD – solving the unsolved rare diseases

Daria Julkowska, French National Research Agency (ANR):  European Joint Programme on Rare Diseases

Anna Need, Genomics England:  Genomics England´s Rare Disease programme and GEMM initiative

Philippe Campeau, University of Montreal:  The Canadian Rare Diseases Models and Mechanisms (RDMM) Network

 

15:50-16:50 
Panel Discussion

Advancing rare disease diagnosis and therapeutic research with model organisms - Building bridges between basic and clinical research

 

16:50-17:30
Session 3: Regulator and policy perspectives on rare disease modelling and gene therapy applications

European Medicines Agency (EMA)  -  tbc

Jan Hrusak, Czech Academy of Sciences, J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI):  Long-term sustainability of Research Infrastructures

 

17:00-18:00
Poster session and drinks reception
 

 

Draft agenda, December 4

 

09:00 - 10:40
Session 4: Animal models for human gene therapy applications

Federico Mingozzi, Genethon, Spark Therapeutics:  Gene therapy treatment for a rare liver disease, Crigler-Najjar Syndrome

Helene Puccio, Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology (IGBMC):  Gene therapy for Friedreich ataxia-associated cardiomyopathy

Martin Biel, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU):  Genetic mouse models to develop gene therapies for retinal diseases

Fatima Bosch, Autonomous University of Barcelona:  Disease correction by AAV-mediated gene therapy in mouse models of mucopolysaccharidosis

 

11:00-12:00
Session 5: Gene editing in gene therapy of human (Rare) Diseases

Pietro Genovese, San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-TIGET):  Preclinical modeling highlights the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene editing for correction of SCID-X1.

Paula Rio, CIEMAT/CIBERER-ISCIII:  Therapeutic gene editing in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from Fanconi anemia patients.

Xue Gao (tbc), Rice University:  Treatment of autosomal dominant hearing loss by in vivo delivery of genome editing agents

 

13:00-14:00
Session 6: Optimising gene editing for therapeutics

Wolfgang Wurst, Helmholtz Zentrum München:  CRISPR based approaches for gene therapy taking advantage of split Cas/intein syste

Jacob Corn, ETH Zürich:  CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing: from mechanism to therapy

Colin Fletcher, NIH-NHGRI, Somatic Cell Genome Editing (SCGE) program:  Animal models for gene editing research and preclinical testing

 

14:00-14:20
Session 7: Gene editing for advanced therapies – Ethics, governance, and society

Lluis Montoliu, CSIC-CNB:  ARRIGE - Association for Responsible Research and Innovation in Genome Editing

 

14:20-15:20
Session 8: Stakeholder presentations

Speakers will be selected from submitted abstracts

 

15:20-15:30
Meeting wrap up and closing
Registration, Abstract Submission and Travel Grants

Registration

The INFRAFRONTIER Stakeholder Meeting is open and not restricted to network members.

Meeting registration is required for attendance and records accommodation requirements. Please submit registration details here.

The registration information will be forwarded to the meeting venue. A direct registration at the Hilton Munich Park Hotel is not required.

 

Costs

The attendance of the INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC Stakeholder Meeting 2018 is free of charge.

Accommodation costs for registered participants staying at the Hilton Munich Park hotel will be covered by INFRAFRONTIER.

Participants are expected to cover their own travel expenses to the meeting location.

 

Abstract submission

Meeting participants are invited to submit abstracts covering key meeting topics such asusing model organisms supporting rare disease diagnosis and therapeutic research, or for research using animal models for human gene therapy applications. 

When submitting your abstract you can apply for an oral or poster presentation at the INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC Stakeholder meeting. For oral presentations, preference will be given to Young Investigators.

Abstracts can be submitted using dedicated forms and must be submitted to proposals@infrafrontier.eu until October 30. Selected applicants will be notified by November 15 at the latest.

Please be aware that abstracts may be made available digitally or printed to all delegates at the meeting.

 

Young Investigator Travel Grants

INFRAFRONTIER provides Travel Grants for Young Investigators who finished their Ph.D. within the last 5 years.

The Travel Grants support travel to the meeting and accommodation at the meeting venue. Selection will be based on submitted abstracts.

Meeting venue

Hilton Hotel Munich Park

Situated on the edge of Munich's famous public park `Englischer Garten´, Hilton Munich Park is a modern, elegant International Business Hotel with all the amenities you may expect.

The hotel is only a 30 minutes drive away from Munich airport and within easy reach of all of the city's major businesses and attractions.

 

Hilton Munich Park

Am Tucherpark 7

D - 80538 Munich, Germany

Organizers

INFRAFRONTIER

INFRAFRONTIER is the European Research Infrastructure for phenotyping and archiving of model mammalian genomes. The INFRAFRONTIER Research Infrastructure provides access to first-class tools and data for biomedical research, and thereby contributes to improving the understanding of gene function in human health and disease using the mouse model. The core services of INFRAFRONTIER comprise the systemic phenotyping of mouse mutants in the participating mouse clinics, and the archiving and distribution of mouse mutant lines by the European Mouse Mutant Archive (EMMA).

In addition, INFRAFRONTIER provides specialised services such as the generation of germ-free mice, and training in state of the art cryopreservation and phenotyping technologies.

www.infrafrontier.eu

 

International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC)

The IMPC addresses one of the grand challenges for biology and biomedical science in the 21st century – to determine the function of all the genes in the human genome and their role in disease. The goal of the IMPC is to develop a comprehensive catalogue of mammalian gene function. The IMPC aims to generate a null mutation for every protein-coding gene in the mouse genome, to acquire broad-based phenotype data for each mutation, and to disseminate the mutant resource and phenotype data to the scientific community.

Ultimately, the IMPC program will provide information on the function of all genes and genetic networks and a powerful dataset that will underpin fundamental new insights into the genetic bases for disease.

www.mousephenotype.org

 

Financial support is provided by the INFRAFRONTIER2020 and IPAD-MD projects

INFRAFRONTIER2020 receives funding from European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under Grant Agreement number 73087

IPAD-MD receives funding from European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under Grant Agreement number 653961